recipe

Posted in News, Restaurant, on 13 December 2017, by , 0 Comments

moyo uShaka

November, 2017: It’s summer time and now moyo Durban fans can come on back to the sunniest, saltiest hangout spot KZN has to offer. The moyo uShaka Pier is reopening on 02 December 2017, just in time for year-end celebrations and the holiday mood that is already filling the air.

With the pier being closed for a total of 16 weeks to date, the vital well maintenance has been successfully completed and even more exciting is the announcement that the moyo uShaka team have completely revamped the pier bar which will be revealed to the public for the first time.

The Pier offers guests a new look, a breezy atmosphere and fantastic dreamy ocean views, making the moyo pier the perfect casual African dining experience. With the reveal of the newly revamped pier, moyo will delight guests with a new menu, which focuses on simple African light meals and baskets, featuring burgers, shisanyama and the traditional favourite tripe.

The moyo main restaurant underwent a subdivision as well as some refurbishments in order to enhance the African ambience and make guests feel welcome a home away from home with Mama moyo. “We strive to ensure each guest has an unforgettable moyo experience and for that reason we felt that the store required some refurbishments, allowing us to heighten and enrich the nostalgic, memorable appeal of moyo uShaka”, says moyo Marketing Manager, Lynette Balie.

Furthermore moyo has decided to shift their focus onto the quality of their food rather than quantity, striving to give guests from near and far a truly memorable African experience. The emphasis on the quality of the food gives room to provide specialised cuisine centered around the element of excellence.

So whether it be a sundowner and a snack on the pier or a dinner party in the main restaurant to celebrate the end of the year, moyo uShaka caters to all needs and invites guests to come and celebrate the end of the year in true African style.

Continue Reading...

Posted in Food, on 27 July 2017, by , 0 Comments

Each culinary region in Africa has its own distinctive, unapologetically authentic flavour. While each region on the continent is protective of its particular tastes and recipes, variations of the same dish are generally prepared within the same area on the continent. There is no greater evidence of this than the ongoing debate about who makes better Jollof rice: Ghanaians or Nigerians? In North Africa, which is made up of diverse countries such as Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Morocco, Sudan, Tunisia and Western Sahara, you can enjoy cuisine that is a combination of traditional ingredients and cultural influences. The culinary tradition is always rich in colour and flavour.

Ingredients brought into the region by traders and migrants have heavily influenced the foods of North Africa. Variety, diversity and depth are added to a selection of herbs and spices. Arabs introduced spices such as saffron, nutmeg, cinnamon, ginger and cloves. Turks brought in sweet pastries and other baked goods. Wheat and its by-product semolina were introduced early on, but the nomadic Berbers adapted semolina into couscous. Today, couscous is a staple in North Africa and enjoyed all over the world.

The Mediterranean is a stone’s throw away from North Africa, which means olives and olive oil have become integral to the cooking process. Seafood, goat, lamb, beef, dates, almonds, vegetables and fruit are all staple foods on the North African menu.

The regional nuances within North Africa create an interesting gastronomic blend. In Tunisia, turmeric, dried chilli and mint are common ways to create spicy and hot dishes. In Egypt, stews are rich in vegetables while, in Libya, its history as an Italian colony means tomato-based dishes are more common.

Although desserts aren’t a must-eat after every meal, North African menus boast a host of tasty, rich and sweet desserts. These can range from pastries and puddings drenched in honey syrup, to fruit salads (dates and figs are a favourite) and biscuits, sweet teas and spiced coffees.

With its unique tastes and diverse offering, there is definitely something for everyone to enjoy when indulging in cuisine from North Africa.

Continue Reading...

Posted in Food, on 6 June 2017, by , 0 Comments

Mandazi

Looking an indulgent treat? Aren’t we all! Well in an attempt to switch it up we decided to get baking and made a batch of mandazi –  traditional African doughnuts. Not all is it unbelievably delicious and easy to prepare, but they’re not overwhelmingly sweet. If you’d like to add a little extra sweetness to them we suggest you dust a little powdered-sugar on top or even better serve them with caramel or chocolate dipping sauce. Yum!

INGREDIENTS:

  • 3 cups all-purpose flour
  • ½ cup coconut milk
  • ½ cup sugar
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tsp active dry yeast
  • ½ cup warm water
  • 1 tbsp vegetable oil
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 1 tsp cardamom
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • vegetable oil for frying donuts

METHOD:

  1. In a small bowl mix the yeast and warm water and stir. Let sit for 5 minutes until yeast dissolves.
  2. In the bowl of your mixer, add flour, salt, cardamom, and cinnamon and mix. Add vegetable oil, egg, coconut milk, sugar and yeast mixture.
  3. Using the hook attachment mix everything until the dough is not too sticky and it does no longer stick to the side of the bowl, add additional flour as needed.
  4. Place the dough in an oiled bowl and cover with plastic wrap. Let it rest for about an hour until the dough rises a bit.
  5. Heat oil in a frying pan or a wok works well for this.
  6. Cut the dough in about 6 pieces to make it easier to roll and cut. Roll each piece so that the dough is about 1 cm (less than ½ inch) in thickness. Cut into triangles and place in hot oil. Fry on both sides. Place doughnuts on paper towels to soak up the oil. Repeat with remaining dough.
  7. Sprinkle with powdered sugar and enjoy.
Continue Reading...

Posted in Food, on 5 June 2017, by , 0 Comments

Kachumbari Recipe

Kachumbari is a traditional Kenyan dish, but can be found throughout East Africa and even if you venture into parts of the Middle East. This deliciously refreshing dish can be served as either salad, side dish to accompany your main meal or even appetiser. Made with succulent, fresh ingredients how could you possibly go wrong? Not to mention it’s the ideal summer dish. We just love it with a spicy roast chicken and a green lentil bake!

INGREDIENTS:

  • Three big ripe tomatoes
  • one large onion sliced and soaked in salty water
  • one bunch coriander. roughly chopped
  • Avocado (seasonal) thickly sliced
  • juice of half a lemon
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • chilli (optional)

METHOD:

Slice your onions thinly and soak them separately in a bowl of salty water, we recommend you use warm water and dissolve one tablespoon of salt in the water. Set aside for approximately 15-20 minutes.

Meanwhile, chop or slice the tomatoes –depending on your preference and drain away the excess juice, otherwise your Kachumbari will be drenched, making it soggy and less crisp.

Roughly chop the coriander and other optional ingredients like chilli or avocado.

Mix all the ingredients in a bowl.

Continue Reading...

Posted in Food, on 5 June 2017, by , 0 Comments

flatbread breakfast

Breakfast is most definitely the most important meal of the day, and we love it! But that doesn’t mean we only have to eat it in the morning – we’re major fans of omelettes for dinner. But sometimes we need to mix it up a little which is why we love this recipe we found, with delicious flavours and a North African flare what’s not to love.

INGREDIENTS:

– For the flatbreads:
• 250g plain flour (plus a little extra for dusting)
• Pinch salt
• 1tbsp olive oil
– For the eggs:
• 1 tbsp olive oil
• 1 onion (diced)
• 1 green pepper (deseeded and sliced)
• 1 garlic clove (grated)
• ½ tsp crushed chilli flakes
• 2 x 400g tins chopped tomatoes
• salt and black pepper
• 6 eggs
• 100g feta cheese, try Danish for a creamier texture (crumbled)

METHOD:

To make the flatbreads, sieve the flour and a generous pinch of salt into a mixing bowl. Make a well in the middle and add the oil. Mix into the flour then add 100-150ml/3½-5fl oz warm water until the mixture comes together to form a dough.

Knead the dough for 3-4 minutes, or until elasticated a little so that the dough springs back while you knead. Set aside to rest.

For the eggs, heat a wide, heavy-based pan over a medium heat. Add the olive oil and, once hot, gently fry the onion with a pinch of salt until softened and translucent. Add the green pepper, cover with a lid and gently fry for further five minutes, or until soft.

Once the pepper is softened, add the garlic. Cook for two minutes, then sprinkle in the chilli flakes and add the chopped tomatoes. Season with a little salt and pepper and cook over a medium-low heat for 10-15 minutes, or until the sauce is rich and flavoursome. Taste and adjust the seasoning as necessary.

Meanwhile, divide the flatbread dough into eight balls. On a lightly floured work surface, roll each ball out to the thickness of a 50p piece (each flatbread should be approximately 12cm/4½in in diameter).

Heat a heavy-based frying pan over a high heat. Cook a flatbread in the dry pan for 2-3 minutes on each side, or until slightly charred, cooked through and a little puffed up. Transfer to a plate and wrap in a clean tea towel. Repeat the process with the remaining dough. Keep warm while you finish the eggs.

Make six wells in the tomato mixture and break an egg into each. Cover the pan and cook gently over a low heat for 3-4 minutes, or until the whites are set (cook for a further 2-3 minutes if you like your yolks set).

Sprinkle with the feta and serve with the warm flatbreads on the side.

Continue Reading...